03/18/2019 Trand set to take delivery of first Liebherr LG 1750 lattice boom mobile crane in the United States

  • Kansas-based company continues trend of adding first of their kind cranes to fleet
  • Trand’s customers include wind farms, oil producers industrial plants and steel erectors

Trand Inc. is scheduled to take delivery of the first Liebherr LG 1750 in the US on March 22 at the Port of Galveston, Texas. It will take an estimated 52 trucks dispatched from the Port of Galveston to deliver the crane to its final destination.

Members of the Trand and Liebherr team that helped bring the first LG 1750 to the US.

Members of the Trand and Liebherr team that helped bring the first LG 1750 to the US.

Terry and Sandra Arnett established Trand in 1990, starting with nine oilfield rig-up trucks for moving drilling rigs. The company purchased its first hydraulic crane in 1996. Trand added a Liebherr LTM 1750-9.1 to its fleet in 2014 and a second crane of that type in 2015.

The LG 1750 is widely used in Europe and combines features of Liebherr’s LR and LTM type cranes. The LG 1750 is an 850 US ton class eight axle crane with speed dependent rear steering. It has the mobility of a drivable carrier and the lifting capacity of a crawler crane. The LG 1750 has a 633 foot maximum hoist height, six winches, and variable boom systems.

The LG 1750 is an 8 axle, 850 US ton lattice boom mobile crane, shown here in transport configuration.

The LG 1750 is an 8 axle, 850 US ton lattice boom mobile crane, shown here in transport configuration.

A reinforced main boom is standard equipment. Lifting capacity is maximized due to extension of the superstructure without using a derrick system. Its boom systems are optimized for use by the wind industry. Safety features also are a central element of the crane’s design. The LG 1750 features numerous platforms, handholds and railings, as well as access ladders at all lattice stations.

“Recent engineering modifications to the axle configurations make the LG 1750 much more roadable in the US. And increased turbine height and weight make it a crane that will be productive today and in the future,” said Jim Strobush, Liebherr product manager for crawler cranes.